The Atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ is the heart and core and center of revealed religion.

Elder Bruce R. McConkie Christ and the Creation

October 13, 2016

Fundamental Principles, Nibley, Preexistence, Rescue

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Joseph Smith took the gospel of Christ back even before Abraham to Adam and beyond, revealing the Atonement as “the plan of redemption … prepared from the foundation of the world” (Alma 12:30)—that is, when it was approved at the Council in Heaven. This event is often mentioned in the earliest Christian and Jewish literature, 13 one of the most notable texts being the “Discourse on Abbaton” by Timothy, Archbishop of Alexandria (circa a.d. 380). 14 When the plan was voted on, according to this account and others, it was turned down. The earth herself complained, as in the Book of Moses and other Enoch literature, of the defilement it would bring upon her, knowing the kind of inhabitants to come (see Moses 7:48–49); and the heavenly host objected to a plan that would cause such a vast amount of sin and suffering.

The Only Begotten broke the deadlock by volunteering to go down and pay the price. This opened the way; the plan could go forward; and the sons of God and the morning stars all sang and shouted for joy (see Job 38:7) in a great creation hymn that has left an indelible mark in ancient literature and ritual. The Lord had made it all possible, leaving men their agency, and obeying the Father in all things. But Satan and his followers refused to accept the majority vote; for that, Satan was deprived of his glory in a reversal of the ritual endowment and was cast out of heaven, which was the reverse of at-one-ment. 15

Only in such a context does the Atonement, otherwise so baffling, take on its full significance. There is not a word among those translated as “atonement” which does not plainly indicate the return to a former state or condition; one rejoins the family, returns to the Father, becomes united, reconciled, embracing and sitting down happily with others after a sad separation. We want to get back, but to do that, we must resist the alternative: being taken into the community of “the prince of this world.” (John 12:31.)

Hugh W. Nibley

“The Atonement of Jesus Christ, Part 2” Ensign, Aug 1990, 30

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November 2, 2015

Hymns, Preexistence, Salvation, Vandagriff

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When We Lived with our Father

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When we lived with our Father in palaces of light,
We never felt of suffering, of loneliness or fright.
We trusted that God loved us, before we said good-bye,
For He gave us a Savior upon whom we rely.

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We came to earth without Him, our hearts still feel the loss
Of loving arms around us, bright days that now are lost.
Our mortal flesh brings choices, and we so often err.
We follow other voices, we fail to kneel in prayer.

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But we still have our Savior, the Son we knew above.
He taught us, showed us mercy, the fullness of His love.
He never will forget us or leave us in the night.
When we call out for Jesus, He comes and brings His light.

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Our hearts were filled with anguish when He hung on the cross.
We knew He suffered for us, that we supplied the cost.
Our Father had us watch Him though we would hide our eyes,
So we would never doubt Him, that He would hear our cries.

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For only His Atonement can raise us from the grave
And cleanse us, lift us homeward with families He has saved.
He’ll bring us back to Father, embrace us with delight,
As shining men and women, as beings filled with light.

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David P. Vandagriff
Copyright 2011, All Rights Reserved
May be sung to the tune of Hymn 197, O Savior, Thou Who Wearest a Crown

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November 2, 2015

Fundamental Principles, Nibley, Preexistence, Rescue

Comments Off on Volunteering to Go Down and Pay the Price

Joseph Smith took the gospel of Christ back even before Abraham to Adam and beyond, revealing the Atonement as “the plan of redemption … prepared from the foundation of the world” (Alma 12:30)—that is, when it was approved at the Council in Heaven. This event is often mentioned in the earliest Christian and Jewish literature, one of the most notable texts being the “Discourse on Abbaton” by Timothy, Archbishop of Alexandria (circa a.d. 380). When the plan was voted on, according to this account and others, it was turned down. The earth herself complained, as in the Book of Moses and other Enoch literature, of the defilement it would bring upon her, knowing the kind of inhabitants to come (see Moses 7:48–49); and the heavenly host objected to a plan that would cause such a vast amount of sin and suffering.

The Only Begotten broke the deadlock by volunteering to go down and pay the price. This opened the way; the plan could go forward; and the sons of God and the morning stars all sang and shouted for joy (see Job 38:7) in a great creation hymn that has left an indelible mark in ancient literature and ritual. The Lord had made it all possible, leaving men their agency, and obeying the Father in all things. But Satan and his followers refused to accept the majority vote; for that, Satan was deprived of his glory in a reversal of the ritual endowment and was cast out of heaven, which was the reverse of at-one-ment.

Only in such a context does the Atonement, otherwise so baffling, take on its full significance. There is not a word among those translated as “atonement” which does not plainly indicate the return to a former state or condition; one rejoins the family, returns to the Father, becomes united, reconciled, embracing and sitting down happily with others after a sad separation. We want to get back, but to do that, we must resist the alternative: being taken into the community of “the prince of this world.” (John 12:31.)

Hugh W. Nibley

“The Atonement of Jesus Christ, Part 2” Ensign, Aug 1990, 30

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter